June 4, 2019 •

San Francisco Ethics Commission Adopts Code Changes

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The San Francisco Ethics Commission voted to adopt amendments to the Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code. The changes include electronic filing, filing of contribution disclosures no later than 14 days following the contribution, and updating filing forms. The changes provide […]

The San Francisco Ethics Commission voted to adopt amendments to the Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code.

The changes include electronic filing, filing of contribution disclosures no later than 14 days following the contribution, and updating filing forms.

The changes provide clarity regarding code sections created by the Anti-Corruption and Accountability Ordinance and update the regulations to match other recent changes to the code.

Additionally, changes provide clarity about various provisions of the Campaign Finance Reform Ordinance.

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May 20, 2019 •

San Francisco Ethics Commission Propose Code Changes

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The San Francisco Ethics Commission will hold its next regular meeting on May 29. The commission will consider and possibly act on a set of proposed regulation changes to the Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code. These changes include electronic filing, […]

The San Francisco Ethics Commission will hold its next regular meeting on May 29.

The commission will consider and possibly act on a set of proposed regulation changes to the Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code.

These changes include electronic filing, filing of contribution disclosures no later than 14 days following the contribution, and updating filing forms.

The proposed changes are intended to provide clarity regarding code sections created by the Anti-Corruption and Accountability Ordinance and update the regulations to match other recent changes to the code.

Changes additionally provide clarity about various provisions of the Campaign Finance Reform Ordinance.

Opportunity for public comment will be provided at the meeting.

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June 25, 2018 •

San Francisco Amends Campaign Finance and Conflict of Interest Provisions

Legislation amending San Francisco’s Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code takes effect next week. Ordinance No. 129-18 is effective June 30, though most of its provisions are not operative until January 1, 2019. The ordinance extends the restriction period for contractor […]

Legislation amending San Francisco’s Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code takes effect next week. Ordinance No. 129-18 is effective June 30, though most of its provisions are not operative until January 1, 2019.

The ordinance extends the restriction period for contractor contributions from six to 12 months following contract approval. It also requires interested parties making a behested payment or payments of $10,000 or more to file a disclosure within 30 days.

Other changes include, but are not limited to, additional disclosure requirements for contributions from business entities and for bundled campaign contributions, as well as an additional pre-election statement for committees.

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May 17, 2018 •

San Francisco Campaign Finance Reform Legislation Passes First Reading

The San Francisco, California Board of Supervisors unanimously passed, on first reading, campaign finance reform legislation aimed at providing more transparency in political contributions. Among other provisions, the legislation will include pay-to-play provisions, local behested payment reporting requirements for both […]

The San Francisco, California Board of Supervisors unanimously passed, on first reading, campaign finance reform legislation aimed at providing more transparency in political contributions.

Among other provisions, the legislation will include pay-to-play provisions, local behested payment reporting requirements for both donors and City officers, and additional disclosure requirements for contributions made by business entities.

The legislation must pass a second reading at the Board of Supervisors and be signed by the mayor prior to becoming law.

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March 1, 2018 •

San Francisco Board Member Moves to Hold a Joint Meeting

The San Francisco, California Board of Supervisors and Ethics Commission may hold a joint meeting and possibly vote on a campaign finance reform measure on April 3. The Ethics Commission has spent two years drafting reforms regulating areas including behested […]

The San Francisco, California Board of Supervisors and Ethics Commission may hold a joint meeting and possibly vote on a campaign finance reform measure on April 3.

The Ethics Commission has spent two years drafting reforms regulating areas including behested payments, bundling contributions, independent expenditure committees, and conflicts of interest related to developers and city contractors.

Supervisor Aaron Peskin introduced a motion on February 27 to hold the joint meeting, and the full board is expected to vote on that motion as early as March 6.

Both the commission and the board need to approve the same version of the reform legislation for it to become law.

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January 24, 2018 •

San Francisco, California Has New Mayor

The San Francisco, California Board of Supervisors voted 6-3 on January 23 to appoint District 2 Supervisor Mark Farrell as acting mayor and to remove Board President London Breed. Breed became acting mayor in December when Mayor Ed Lee suddenly died of […]

The San Francisco, California Board of Supervisors voted 6-3 on January 23 to appoint District 2 Supervisor Mark Farrell as acting mayor and to remove Board President London Breed.

Breed became acting mayor in December when Mayor Ed Lee suddenly died of a heart attack.

By accepting the appointment, Farrell is giving up his District 2 seat and will have a chance to appoint his successor.

Under the city charter, the board may appoint a successor to serve until the June 5 election.

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December 12, 2017 •

San Francisco, California Mayor Ed Lee Dies Suddenly

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee died in the early hours of December 12 after suffering an apparent heart attack. The President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, London Breed, is now the acting mayor of San Francisco. The Board […]

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee died in the early hours of December 12 after suffering an apparent heart attack.

The President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, London Breed, is now the acting mayor of San Francisco.

The Board of Supervisors may now vote to make Breed the temporary mayor or choose another candidate.

If a majority of the remaining 10 supervisors cannot agree on a candidate, Breed would remain in the office until the June 2018 election.

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November 29, 2017 •

San Francisco Ethics Commission Approves Anti-Corruption and Accountability Ordinance

At its November 27 meeting, the San Francisco Ethics Commission gave final approval to recommend and transmit to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors its Anti-Corruption and Accountability Ordinance. The ordinance would create or expand certain pay-to-play prohibitions on political […]

At its November 27 meeting, the San Francisco Ethics Commission gave final approval to recommend and transmit to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors its Anti-Corruption and Accountability Ordinance.

The ordinance would create or expand certain pay-to-play prohibitions on political contributions, institute new disclosure requirements, create local rules for reporting behested payments, and create new rules regarding conflicts of interest.

The Commission will transmit its recommendations to the Board of Supervisors, where at least eight votes will be required to adopt the proposal.

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October 12, 2017 •

San Francisco Looks to Limit Behested Payments

The San Francisco Ethics Commission has proposed to place strict limits on behested payments. A behested payment is when a public official asks a person or group to donate to a civic or charitable cause instead of directly to the […]

The San Francisco Ethics Commission has proposed to place strict limits on behested payments.

A behested payment is when a public official asks a person or group to donate to a civic or charitable cause instead of directly to the public official, and the proposal would ban these requests. The penalty for officials could be $5,000 for each violation, but there would be no penalty for the donor.

If this proposal becomes an ordinance, the city’s Board of Supervisors would have to approve it. The commission could also put the changes on a ballot, which would be decided by voters in June of 2018.

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August 31, 2017 •

San Francisco Ethics Commission to Consider Pay-to-Play Ordinance

At its August 28, 2017, meeting, the San Francisco Ethics Commission discussed the adoption of the 2017 San Francisco Anti-Corruption and Accountability Ordinance to revise city campaign and government conduct laws. The ordinance would create a series of new rules […]

At its August 28, 2017, meeting, the San Francisco Ethics Commission discussed the adoption of the 2017 San Francisco Anti-Corruption and Accountability Ordinance to revise city campaign and government conduct laws.

The ordinance would create a series of new rules to reduce the incidence of pay-to-play politics by increasing the applicability of current pay-to-play laws to encompass more parties seeking contracts with the city. The ordinance would also create new limits and disclosure requirements on contributions and behested payments.

The commission voted 4-0 to continue the matter to its next meeting on September 25, 2017.

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November 9, 2016 •

San Francisco Passes Ballot Issue Restricting Gifts and Contributions from Lobbyists

Voters in San Francisco overwhelmingly passed a city ballot initiative restricting lobbyist gifts and campaign contributions. Local Ballot Measure T, passed with over 87 percent support, prohibits lobbyists from making any gift to a city officer, regardless of value, prohibits […]

San Francisco sealVoters in San Francisco overwhelmingly passed a city ballot initiative restricting lobbyist gifts and campaign contributions.

Local Ballot Measure T, passed with over 87 percent support, prohibits lobbyists from making any gift to a city officer, regardless of value, prohibits lobbyists from using a third-party to circumvent this restriction, and prohibits city officers from accepting or soliciting such gifts. The gift restriction specifically includes any gift of travel. The measure defines “Gift of travel” as payment, advance, or reimbursement for travel, including transportation, lodging, and food and refreshments connected with the travel.

The measure also requires lobbyists to identify which city agencies they intend to influence and imposes a duty on local lobbyists to amend and update their registration information and monthly reports within five days of any changed circumstances.

The initiative also prohibits a lobbyist from making contributions to or bundling contributions for city elected officials or candidates for city elective offices if the lobbyist had been registered to lobby the officials’ agencies within 90 days of the date any contribution is made.

The changes to the city’s lobbying laws becomes effective January 1, 2018.

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August 29, 2016 •

City of San Francisco Elected Officials Prohibited from Establishing Candidate Controlled General Purpose Committees

Effective September 3, 2016, city elected officials in San Francisco will be prohibited from controlling candidate controlled general purpose committees. The goal of the new ordinance is to stop elected officials from establishing such committees to use as slush funds […]

Flag_of_San_Francisco.svgEffective September 3, 2016, city elected officials in San Francisco will be prohibited from controlling candidate controlled general purpose committees.

The goal of the new ordinance is to stop elected officials from establishing such committees to use as slush funds for unlimited contributions.

Candidates controlling candidate controlled general purpose committees will be required to return, use, or dispose of all committee funds within 90 days of taking office.

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May 3, 2016 •

SF Ethics Commission to Hold Interested Persons Meetings

The San Francisco Ethics Commission has announced two interested persons meetings on May 11 and May 16 to discuss a proposed November 2016 ballot measure that would ask San Francisco voters to place new restrictions on lobbyist contributions, bundling of […]

San FranciscoThe San Francisco Ethics Commission has announced two interested persons meetings on May 11 and May 16 to discuss a proposed November 2016 ballot measure that would ask San Francisco voters to place new restrictions on lobbyist contributions, bundling of contributions by lobbyists, and gifts from lobbyists.

The feedback from these meetings will be used in the analysis and recommendations on the proposed ballot measure presented at the May 23, 2016 commission meeting.

Written comments and RSVPs can be sent via email to ethics.commission@sfgov.org.

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March 25, 2016 •

San Francisco Ethics Commission to Begin Audit Selection

At its March 28, 2016, meeting, the San Francisco Ethics Commission will discuss and possibly select campaign committees and lobbyists for the commission’s 2015 random audits. The commission recommends randomly selecting 20% of campaign committees that reported activity greater than […]

San Francisco Ethics websiteAt its March 28, 2016, meeting, the San Francisco Ethics Commission will discuss and possibly select campaign committees and lobbyists for the commission’s 2015 random audits.

The commission recommends randomly selecting 20% of campaign committees that reported activity greater than $10,000 in 2015.

It is also proposed that four lobbying entities should be randomly selected for audit. The commission estimates the audits will take 18 months to complete.

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